Skip to main content

While taking a break from schedules and lesson planning, started reading

“What the Bleep Do We Know: Discovering the Endless Possibilities for Altering Everyday Reality” by William Arntz, Betsy Chasse and Mark Vicente

I recently purchased the book and the movie, plus gave one sister the movie and one sister the book for their birthdays. It is very interesting and makes you think.

A few excerpts from Chapter one:

"Let’s say a spaceship lands next to you on the coffee table (does size matter?) and inside is The Universal Book of Everything. And you get to ask one question. What is that question?"


I thought about the question and drew a complete blank. The image in my mind was of a tiny spaceship landing in my living room and thinking where they came from, instead of a great question. Instantly sidetracked. Okay, think! What do I want to know? Something Philosophical, esoteric, or maybe just silly? There isn’t just any one right question. A series of things ran through my head which immediately eliminated because I knew the answer. For example: I know God created the universe – whether it was from a tiny exploding atom or from Him creating the world in 7 days, He is responsible for us being here. Went back to reading the chapter and decided to think about the question later.

Bonus Question: Think of something that you are just plain curious about?"

"Now a question that you will add to The Universal Book of Everything: What is the one thing that you know for sure?"

Okay, I have to think about those, will get back to it.

"Why ask a great question? Asking a great question is an invitation to an adventure, a journey of discovery. Its thrilling to set out on a new adventure; there’s the bliss of freedom to explore new territory (page3)

A university professor visited Zen master Nan-in to inquire about Zen. But instead of listening to the master, the scholar kept going on about his own ideas. After listening for some time, Nan-in served tea. He poured his visitor’s cup full, then kept on pouring. The tea flowed over the sides of the cup, filled the saucer, spilled onto the man’s pants and onto the floor. “Don’t you see that the cup is full” the professor exploded. “You can’t get any more in.” “Just so" replied Nan-in calmly. “And like this cup, you are full of your own ideas and opinions. How can I show you Zen unless you first empty your cup?” (pg 6)

Reminds me of a few people I know!

Emptying the cup means making room for Great Questions. It means being open, reconditioning ourselves so that we can accept, for the time being, not knowing. Out of that a greater knowing will dawn. (pg 6)

Hmm....

Pondering the Great Question is a wonderful way to spend "quality time with your mind. When was the last time you took your mind on a wild ride of mystery? Tried to get to the other side of infinity?"

I asked James - If you could ask any question what would it be?

His response: Is there more?

I am not quite sure what he was referring to, whether is just the moment in time and wanted more of something, but it was an interesting answer. Is there more? More what? More to this day, time, food, world, universe.

1st question: In what galaxy is there other life similar to our planet Earth? Not is there other life? Because there must be, but where is there other life.

Bonus Question: Will we ever learn to breath underwater or fly on our own? Like when we dream that we are souring through the air or diving underwater without any equipment.

Answer that will be added to The Universal Book of Everything: (What is the one thing you know for sure?) Our lives are touched by everyone who moves through it, whether for a moment, a hour, a day, or a lifetime; minutely or infinitely; and changes it.

Right now I am pondering: Why do kitties have to chew on your pencil and sit on your notebook, preventing you from writing. Or insist on sleeping in your arms or on your shoulder, so that you have to type one handed. ATTACK!

"Asking yourself these deeper questions opens up new ways of being in the world. It brings in a breath of fresh air. It makes life more joyful. The real trick to life is not to be in the know, but to be in the mystery."

Fred Alan Wolf

How would you answer if a spaceship landed in your living room?


Comments