Showing posts with label First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday. Show all posts
Showing posts with label First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 3, 2012

First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday

Bibliophile by the Sea
Every Tuesday, Diane of Bibliophile by the Sea posts the opening paragraph (sometimes two) of a book she decided to read based on the opening paragraph. Feel free to grab the banner and play along!

This week's pick is

Comedy in a minor key

"There they are again." the doctor said suddenly, and he stood up.  Unexpectedly, like his words, the noise of the approaching airplane motors slipped into the silence of the death chamber. He tilted his head to one side, squinted his eyes half shut, and listened.  As if a small generator hidden somewhere in the house has started and quickly revved up to full speed, the droning sound of the night squadron flying in grew stronger.  It might also--or so it seemed at first--be coming from the basement, or from the house next door"


What do you think?  Would you want to read more?

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday


Every Tuesday, Diane of Bibliophile by the Sea posts the opening paragraph (sometimes two) of a book she decided to read based on the opening paragraph. Feel free to grab the banner and play along!


The Passage by Justin Cronin
Before she became the Girl from Nowhere--the One Who Walked in, The First and Last and Only, who lived a thousand years--she was just a little girl in Iowa named Amy. Amy Harper Bellafonte.

The day Amy was born, her mother, Jeanette, was nineteen years old.  Jeanette named her baby Amy for her own mother, who'd died when Jeanette was little, and gave her the middle name Harper for Harper Lee, the lady who'd written To Kill a Mockingbird, Jeanette's favorite book--truth be told, the only book she'd made it all the way through in high school.  She might have named her Scout, after the little girl in the story, because she wanted her little girl to grow up like that, tough and funny and wise, in a way that she, Jeanette, had never managed to be.  But Scout was a name for a boy, and she didn't want her daughter to have to go around her whole life explaining something like that."


Nook book while doing Treadmill
Canyons of Night  #3 in Looking Glass Trilogy by Jayne Castle
"Charlotte folded her arms on the glass topped sales counter and watched the two feral beasts come through the door of Looking Glass Antiques.  One was definitely human, definitely male, and definitely dangerous.  The second was a scruffy-looking ball of gray fluff with two bright blue eyes, six small paws, and an attitude.  The dust bunny rode on Slade Attridge's shoulder and Charlotte was quite sure that in his own miniature way he could be just as dangerous as hsi human companion.  They were both born to hunt, she thought."

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday

Bibliophile by the Sea


Every Tuesday, Diane of Bibliophile by the Sea posts the opening paragraph (sometimes two) of a book she decided to read based on the opening paragraph. Feel free to grab the banner and play along!


Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
A to Z Challenge book by title - paperback

"He was tall, about fifty, with darkly handsome, almost sinister features: a neatly trimmed mustache, hair turning sliver at the temples, and eyes so black they were like the tinted windows of a sleek limousine - he could see out, but you couldn't see in. We were sitting in the living room of his Victorian house. It was a mansion, really, with fifteen-foot ceilings and large, well-proportioned rooms. A graceful spiral stairway rose from the center hall toward a domed skylight.  There was a ballroom on the second floor. It was Mercer House, one of the last of Savannah's great houses still in private hands. Together with the walled garden and the carriage house in back, it occupied an entire city block. If Mercer House was not quite the biggest private house in Savannah, it was certainly the most grandly furnished. Architectural Digest had devoted six pages to it. A book on the interiors of the world's great houses featured it alongside Sagamore Hill, Biltmore, and Chartwell. Mercer House was the envy of house-proud Savannah. Jim Williams lived in it alone."

 A to Z challenge by Title - Nook Book

By the Light of the Moon - Dean Koontz



 "Shortly before being knocked unconscious and bound to a chair, before being injected with an unknown substance against his will, and before discovering that the world was deeply mysterious in ways he'd never before imagined, Dylan O'Conner left his motel room and walked across the highway to a brightly lighted fast-food franchise to buy cheeseburgers, French fries, pocket pies with apple filling, and a vanilla milkshake."